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An interview with Dr Greg Stewart, president of the WFC

By |January 8, 2015|Public Health|

Greg Stewart

Dr Greg Stewart

Source Canadian Chiropractor

Mari-Len De Guzman of Canadian Chiropractor magazine talked with the president of the World Federation of Chiropractic Dr Greg Stewart about global opportunities, collaboration and the chiropractic values.

What Dr Stewart is most excited about is the opportunity to help advance the chiropractic profession as an equal player in the global health care arena, helping solve some of the world’s most pressing health issues.

“The opportunities have never been better. It’s a matter of whether we have the courage to walk through the doors that are open”, says Stewart. The World Health Organization has acknowledged the need for leadership in the area of spinal disorders, which are now a greater contributor to the burden of disease than HIV/AIDS, malaria, stroke, lung and breast cancer, and diabetes.

Says Stewart, “We have the ability to change the way the world is dealing with their health care. It’s cost-effective, it’s drugless, it has unlimited possibilities to help improve the health of the world and decrease the burden of disability world-wide.”

There are many reasons to be encouraged. “We have situations like in Denmark and Switzerland, where the curriculum for chiropractic and medicine is the same for the first three years, with chiropractic and medical students in the same classes until they branch off to their different streams in later years, “ Stewart notes. This early exposure to one another is enabling a new generation of health care practitioners that is much more inclined to collaboration.

“We have to leave our little comfortable areas and actually go into areas that are challenging, and sometimes confrontational, in order to get ahead,” he says.

Stewart acknowledges there are still ongoing issues that may have to be ironed out within the profession, but cautions against letting these internal disagreements get in the way of progress for the profession.

Stewart is confident the profession can effect big changes in health care, nationally and globally. “It’s my personal goal to really move away from chiropractic just trying to survive, into a world where we flourish.”

Read the full interview at Canadian Chiropractor.

Texas: Chiropractic board pulls proposed rule to create specialties in nutrition, neurology

By |August 21, 2012|Scope of Practice|

From an article in  Statesman.com August 19th, 2012

The Texas Board of Chiropractic Examiners has said it will re-examine proposals to allow chiropractors to call themselves specialists in nutrition and neurology after hearing complaints from dietitians and physicians.

At a meeting in Austin on Thursday, the board heard from registered dietitians urging it to withdraw a proposal to create a specialty in chiropractic nutrition. The board also received letters from the Texas Medical Association and physicians strongly objecting to a chiropractic neurology specialty.

The board did not meet beforehand with the affected groups, as it is required to do, representatives of those groups said. Further, they have complained that the specialist training would be too little or vague and would confuse and potentially endanger the public. (more…)

The CCE and Section 602.13

By |January 24, 2012|Guidelines|

 As has been (not so) widely reported, the National Advisory Committee on Institutional Quality and Integrity (NACIQI) of the US Department of Education met on December 14, 2011 to consider the Council on Chiropractic Education’s petition for renewal of recognition. The process of continuing the recognition of an existing agency is generally unremarkable, often requiring only 15 minutes or so of discussion.

This proceeding involving CCE was anything but routine, with four hours of public comments, agency responses, and deliberations. In the end the Department of Education staff identified over 40 compliance issues that the CCE needs to address within the next year. These areas of deficiency exceeded the norm for re-accreditation violations. Chairman Wickes referred to the quantity of citations as “an embarrassing number.” The CCE expects an official letter from NACIQI approximately 90 days from the hearing date and they expect to be granted a maximum of 12 months from the date of this document to address the identified deficiencies. The Council predicts a deadline of March 2013 to complete a compliance report to NACIQI’s committee liaison.

Following overwhelming written and oral testimony to the committee expressing concerns about the CCE from the profession at large, the NACIQI added the following statement: “In addition to the numerous issues identified in the staff report, NACIQI asks the agency to demonstrate compliance with Section 602.13 dealing with the wide acceptance of its standards, policies, procedures, and decisions; and to address how its standards advance quality in chiropractic education.” (more…)

Majority of Alabama Chiropractors Favor Limited Prescription Rights

By |February 18, 2011|Expanded Practice, News|

Source Chiropractic Economics

The Alabama State Chiropractic Association (ASCA) conducted a survey of member practitioners in 2010 regarding the scope of practice in Alabama. Overall, results indicated that a majority of surveyed chiropractors are in favor of the inclusion of injectable vitamins and nutrients and prescriptive rights in the scope of practice…

Within the group of 255 respondents, 63 percent percent agreed or strongly agreed that chiropractic is a drugless alternative to allopathic medical care, and the same proportion of respondents felt that chiropractic is the detection and correction of subluxations. Seventy-six percent agreed that subluxation is an important cause of disease and correction can restore health.

However, 41 percent responded that the chiropractic profession should abandon the term subluxation and focus on a broader scope of practice in general. A majority were also in favor of chiropractors utilizing injectable vitamins and nutrients (58 percent), as well as prescriptions of certain drugs (60 percent). (more…)

A Constitutional Challenge to DCs Diagnosing – What This Means for Health Care

By |April 27, 2010|Legal Action|

A Constitutional Challenge to DCs Diagnosing –
What This Means for Health Care

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   ProviderLaw.Com

By Keith Pendleton, JD

President of ProviderLAW


I. The Lawsuit in Texas

In January, 2006, the American Medical Association (AMA) announced an industry consortium known as the “Scope of Practice Partnership” (SOPP).

The consortium was originally formed by the AMA, along with 6 national medical specialty societies and 6 state medical associations, including the Texas Medical Association (TMA).

As part of its formation, the original members of SOPP agreed that they needed to begin reigning in the scope of practices of various professions, the chiropractic profession included.

Specifically, SOPP members agreed that it was “necessary to concentrate the resources of organized medicine to oppose scope of practice expansions by allied health professionals that threaten the health and safety of the public … through a wide-range of efforts, including … judicial advocacy….” (emphasis added).

Organized medicine?” Are we talking about a nationwide campaign here?

Threaten the health and safety of the public?” Is this really what this is about?

As part of the announcement, organized medicine resolved to challenge the scope of practice of various health care professions in a comprehensive, nationwide, consistent manner, including through use of the courts.
(more…)