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The Evidence Informed Chiropractic Challenge

By |October 30, 2014|Philosophy|

Source The Evidence Informed Chiropractic Challenge

What’s the Buzz

A recent social media posting has generated a bit of a buzz in the world of chiropractic. It seems that a short essay by chiropractor Rob Sinnott on October 16th elucidating the role that chiropractic and the subluxation play in the regulation of the immune system created some disagreement among the ranks. To demonstrate his thesis Dr Sinnott chose a timely example. Ebola. As you read his piece you may have some doubts as to the wisdom of this choice. You can read his original post here.

At any rate, Dr Dave Newell, Director of Research at the AECC and long time chiropractic academic with over 25 years experience in the sciences and clinical research, felt the need to protest the claims presented by Dr Sinnott. Dr Newell expressed his concerns regarding Sinnott’s post in an email to the Annals of Vertebral Subluxation Research (AVSR), which is published by the Foundation for Vertebral Subluxation, where Sinnott is an advisory board member. You can read that letter here.

The Sinnott piece was then, in turn, defended by Dr Matthew McCoy in an article on his website, The Chronicles of Chiropractic – The source for news on conservative, traditional chiropractic. You can read that reply here.

The Evidence Informed Chiropractic Challenge

And so, the evidence-based group is convinced that the view expressed by Drs McCoy and Sinnott is a minority position and are challenging chiropractors to take a stand. Are you for or against the original article that they claim damages the profession as a whole.

You can cast your vote here.

Biomechanical Lesion: A Better Diagnostic Term for the Profession

By |September 19, 2012|Philosophy|

By John R. Bomar, DC
Source Dynamic Chiropractic

For those who may not be aware, the World Health Organization’s latest revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) uses a new primary term to describe the major condition treated by chiropractic physicians.

The new term is biomechanical lesion and the code is M99, with decimal designations used for various sections of the body – e.g., M99.01, Biomechanical lesion, cervical region. It is thought that the ICD-10 system will be required sometime in 2014.

More than a few chiropractors, myself included, feel this change in nomenclature is much-needed. The present term, non-allopathic lesion (739 series), completely fails to communicate the nature of the problems we address daily in our offices, and the term non-allopathic implies the concept of “non-medical,” as if what we treat has little to do with a person’s health. Such a maldescriptive phrase does nothing to clear up the confusion and misconceptions associated with our work – misconstructions that only contribute to the apprehension and fear many feel when considering our profession.

Such vague and indistinct terminology also discourages appropriate referral from other health care providers. Important also is the current void in understanding that exists between chiropractic providers and the insurance industry. Complicating all this is the insistence by some in our profession that others conform to our definition of the word subluxation, which is in conflict with the accepted medical definition. The natural reaction in others to such uncertainty, obscurity, confusion and doubt is a hesitancy to involve oneself in such dealings, further isolating our profession and hindering growth. (more…)

The CCE and Section 602.13

By |January 24, 2012|Guidelines|

 As has been (not so) widely reported, the National Advisory Committee on Institutional Quality and Integrity (NACIQI) of the US Department of Education met on December 14, 2011 to consider the Council on Chiropractic Education’s petition for renewal of recognition. The process of continuing the recognition of an existing agency is generally unremarkable, often requiring only 15 minutes or so of discussion.

This proceeding involving CCE was anything but routine, with four hours of public comments, agency responses, and deliberations. In the end the Department of Education staff identified over 40 compliance issues that the CCE needs to address within the next year. These areas of deficiency exceeded the norm for re-accreditation violations. Chairman Wickes referred to the quantity of citations as “an embarrassing number.” The CCE expects an official letter from NACIQI approximately 90 days from the hearing date and they expect to be granted a maximum of 12 months from the date of this document to address the identified deficiencies. The Council predicts a deadline of March 2013 to complete a compliance report to NACIQI’s committee liaison.

Following overwhelming written and oral testimony to the committee expressing concerns about the CCE from the profession at large, the NACIQI added the following statement: “In addition to the numerous issues identified in the staff report, NACIQI asks the agency to demonstrate compliance with Section 602.13 dealing with the wide acceptance of its standards, policies, procedures, and decisions; and to address how its standards advance quality in chiropractic education.” (more…)

Majority of Alabama Chiropractors Favor Limited Prescription Rights

By |February 18, 2011|Expanded Practice, News|

Source Chiropractic Economics

The Alabama State Chiropractic Association (ASCA) conducted a survey of member practitioners in 2010 regarding the scope of practice in Alabama. Overall, results indicated that a majority of surveyed chiropractors are in favor of the inclusion of injectable vitamins and nutrients and prescriptive rights in the scope of practice…

Within the group of 255 respondents, 63 percent percent agreed or strongly agreed that chiropractic is a drugless alternative to allopathic medical care, and the same proportion of respondents felt that chiropractic is the detection and correction of subluxations. Seventy-six percent agreed that subluxation is an important cause of disease and correction can restore health.

However, 41 percent responded that the chiropractic profession should abandon the term subluxation and focus on a broader scope of practice in general. A majority were also in favor of chiropractors utilizing injectable vitamins and nutrients (58 percent), as well as prescriptions of certain drugs (60 percent). (more…)

UK General Chiropractic Council Publishes Guidance Sheet on the Subluxation

By |May 24, 2010|News|

Source The General Chiropractic Council

The General Chiropractic Council is the body charged with regulating and developing chiropractic in the United Kingdom. This guidance document is partly in response to the British Chiropractic Association’s litigation with science writer Simon Singh.

The document…

GUIDANCE ON CLAIMS MADE FOR THE CHIROPRACTIC VERTEBRAL SUBLUXATION COMPLEX

The chiropractic vertebral subluxation complex is an historical concept but it remains a theoretical model. It is not supported by any clinical research evidence that would allow claims to be made that it is the cause of disease or health concerns.

Chiropractors are reminded that

  • they must make sure their own beliefs and values do not prejudice the patients’ care (GCC Code of Practice section A3)
  • they must provide evidence based care, which is clinical practice that incorporates the best available evidence from research, the preferences of the patient and the expertise of practitioners, including the individual chiropractor her/himself (GCC Standard of Proficiency section A2.3 and the glossary)
  • any advertised claims for chiropractic care must be based only on best research of the highest standard (GCC Guidance on Advertising issued March 2010)

May 2010