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Chiro Org BLOG

Maternal Report of Outcomes of Chiropractic Care for Infants

By |July 2, 2019|Categories: Patient Satisfaction, Pediatrics|

Maternal Report of Outcomes of Chiropractic Care for Infants

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2019 (Mar; 42 (3): 167–176

Joyce E. Miller, DC, PhD, Heather A. Hanson, DC, MSc, Mandy Hiew, BA, Derek S. Lo Tiap Kwong, BA, Zicheng Mok, BA, Yun-Han Tee, BA

Outpatient Teaching Clinic,
AECC University College,
Bournemouth, Dorset, UK.


OBJECTIVE:   The purpose of this study was to investigate the report by mothers of their infants’ condition before and after a trial of care provided by registered chiropractic clinicians in addition to ratings of satisfaction, cost of care, and reports of any adverse events or side effects. A second purpose was to report the demographic profile of infants who presented for care to 16 chiropractic clinics in the United Kingdom.

METHODS:   This observational study prospectively collected reports by mothers of their infants’ demographic profiles and outcomes across several domains of infant behavior and their own mental state using the United Kingdom Infant Questionnaire. Participating registered chiropractors were recruited through the Royal College of Chiropractors annual meeting in January 2016, and 15 clinics and the Anglo-European College of Chiropractic University College teaching clinic volunteered to participate.

RESULTS:   In all, 2001 mothers completed intake questionnaires and 1092 completed follow-up forms. Statistically significant (P < .05) improvements were reported across all aspects of infant behavior studied, including feeding problems, sleep issues, excessive crying, problems with supine sleep position, infant pain, restricted cervical range of motion, and time performing prone positioning. Maternal ratings of depression, anxiety, and satisfaction with motherhood also demonstrated statistically significant improvement (P < .05). In total, 82% (n = 797) reported definite improvement of their infants on a global impression of change scale. As well, 95% (n = 475) reported feeling that the care was cost-effective, and 90.9% (n = 712) rated their satisfaction 8 or higher on an 11–point scale. Minor self-limiting side effects were reported (5.8%, n = 42/727) but no adverse events.

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PEDIATRICS Section

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Observed Patterns of Cervical Radiculopathy

By |July 1, 2019|Categories: Radiculopathy|

Observed Patterns of Cervical Radiculopathy: How Often Do They Differ From a Standard, “Netter Diagram” Distribution?

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Spine J. 2019 (Jul); 19 (7): 1137–1142

Steven J. McAnany MD , John M. Rhee MD , Evan O. Baird MD , Weilong Shi MD , Jeffrey Konopka MD , Thomas M. Neustein MD , Rafael Arceo MD

Department of Orthopedic Surgery,
Hospital for Special Surgery,
535 East 70th St,
New York, NY 10021, USA.


BACKGROUND CONTEXT:   Traditionally, cervical radiculopathy is thought to present with symptoms and signs in a standard, textbook, reproducible pattern as seen in a “Netter diagram.” To date, no study has directly examined cervical radicular patterns attributable to single level pathology in patients undergoing ACDF.

PURPOSE:   The purpose of this study is to examine cervical radiculopathy patterns in a surgical population and determine how often patients present with the standard textbook (ie, Netter diagram) versus nonstandard patterns.

STUDY DESIGN/SETTING:   A retrospective study.

PATIENT SAMPLE:   Patients who had single-level radiculopathy with at least 75% improvement of preoperative symptoms following ACDF were included.

OUTCOME MEASURES:   Epidemiologic variables were collected including age, sex, weight, body mass index, laterality of symptoms, duration of symptoms prior to operative intervention, and the presence of diabetes mellitus. The observed pattern of radiculopathy at presentation, including associated neck, shoulder, upper arm, forearm, and hand pain and/or numbness, was determined from chart review and patient-derived pain diagrams.

METHODS:   We identified all patients with single level cervical radiculopathy operated on between March 2011 and March 2016 by six surgeons. The observed pattern of radiculopathy was compared to a standard textbook pattern of radiculopathy that strictly adheres to a dermatomal map Fisher exact test was used to analyze categorical data and Student t test was used for continuous variables. A one-way ANOVA was used to determine differences in the observed versus expected radicular pattern. A logistic regression model assessed the effect of demographic variables on presentation with a nonstandard radicular pattern.

RESULTS:   Overall, 239 cervical levels were identified. The observed pattern of pain and numbness followed the standard pattern in only 54% (129 of 239; p=.35). When a nonstandard radicular pattern was present, it differed by 1.68 dermatomal levels from the standard (p< .0001). Neck pain on the radiculopathy side was the most prevalent symptom; it was found in 81% (193 of 239) of patients and did not differ by cervical level (p=.72). In a logistic regression model, none of the demographic variables of interest were found to significantly impact the likelihood of presenting with a nonstandard radicular pattern.

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RADICULOPATHY Page

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Our Blog is Just a Tool. Learn How To Use It Now.

By |July 1, 2019|Categories: Announcement|

Our Blog is Just a Tool.
Learn How To Use It Now.

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   A Chiro.Org Editorrial


Every Blog post is an announcement of new material that was just added to one of our many Sections.

I have been compiling (and archiving) peer-reviewed articles since early 1996, and to date we have over 5,000 Abstracts, and hundreds of Full-Text articles on a wide variety of subjects.

When enough material, relating to a particular topic was collected, it was gathered into a new Topical Page in one of our many Sections.

Each Topical page is located in the Section most associated with that topic. Thus, our Attention Deficit Page is located (is a part of) our Pediatrics Section   You get the idea.

Almost ALL of our Sections contain some, or many Topical collections. The LINKS Section is the most extreme example, because it contains 91 different topical pages.

All of the following are “active” Sections that are constantly adding new (and important) materials:

Acupuncture
Alternative Healing Abstracts
Case Studies
Chiropractic Assistants
Chiropractic Research
Documentation
The LINKS
Medicare Info
Nutrition
Pediatrics
Radiology
Stroke and Chiropractic Page
What is the Chiropractic Subluxation?

These other valuable Sections are “archival” in nature, and contain valuable tools for you to use freely:

Chiropractic History
Free Images
New DC’s
Office Forms
R.C. Schafer’s Rehab Monographs
Search Section


How Blog Posts Work

The following is a Graphic “screen grab” of a Blog Post from our Home Page. (more…)

Leadership and Capacity Building in International Chiropractic Research

By |June 21, 2019|Categories: Uncategorized|

Leadership and Capacity Building in International Chiropractic Research: Introducing the Chiropractic Academy for Research Leadership (CARL)

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Chiropractic & Manual Therapies 2018 (Feb 6); 26: 5

Jon Adams, Greg Kawchuk, Alexander Breen, Diana De Carvalho, Andreas Eklund, Matthew Fernandez, Martha Funabashi, Michelle M. Holmes, Melker S. Johansson, Katie de Luca, Craig Moore, Isabelle Pagé, Katherine A. Pohlman, Michael S. Swain, Arnold Y. L. Wong, and Jan Hartvigsen

Faculty of Health,
University of Technology Sydney,
Sydney, Australia.


In an evidence-based health care environment, healthcare professions require a sustainable research culture to remain relevant. At present however, there is not a mature research culture across the chiropractic profession largely due to deficiencies in research capacity and leadership, which may be caused by a lack of chiropractic teaching programs in major universities. As a response to this challenge the Chiropractic Academy for Research Leadership, CARL, was created with the aim of develop a global network of successful early-career chiropractic researchers under the mentorship of three successful senior academics from Australia, Canada, and Denmark. The program centres upon an annual week-long program residential that rotates continental locations over the first three-year cycle and between residentials the CARL fellows work on self-initiated research and leadership initiatives.

Through a competivite application process, the first cohort was selected and consists of 13 early career researchers from five professions in seven countries who represent diverse areas of interests of high relevance for chiropractic. The first residential was held in Odense, Denmark, with the second being planned in April 2018 in Edmonton, Canada, and the final residential to be held in Sydney, Australia in 2019.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Chiropractic Research Section

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The Research Crisis in American Institutions of Complementary and Integrative Health

By |June 18, 2019|Categories: Chiropractic Research|

The Research Crisis in American Institutions of Complementary and Integrative Health:
One Proposed Solution for the Chiropractic Profession

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Chiropractic & Manual Therapies 2019 (Jun 17); 27: 32

Ian D. Coulter and Patricia M. Herman

RAND Corporation,
1776 Main Street, P.O. Box 2138,
Santa Monica, CA 90407-2138, USA


A crisis confronts the Complementary and Integrative Health (CIH) teaching institutions in the US. Research infrastructure is needed to build and sustain productive research programs and retain their own research faculty. In most health professions, this infrastructure is largely built through research grants. In CIH, most educational institutions are funded through student tuition, which has historically also had to be the source for building their research programs. Only a limited number of these institutions have emerged as National Institute of Health (NIH) grant-funded programs. As a result, the American chiropractic institutions have seen a retrenchment in the number of active research programs. In addition, although research training programs e.g., NIH’s K awards are available for CIH researchers, these programs generally result in these researchers leaving their institutions and depriving future CIH practitioners of the benefit of being trained in a culture of research.

One proposed solution is to leverage the substantial research infrastructure and long history of collaboration available at the RAND Corporation (https://www.rand.org) This article presents the proposed five components of the RAND Center for Collaborative CIH Research and the steps required to bring it to being:

1)   the CIH Research Network –   an online resource and collaborative site for CIH researchers;

2)   the CIH Research Advisory Board –   the governing body for the Center selected by its members;

3)   the RAND CIH Interest Group –   a group of RAND researchers with an interest in and who could provide support to CIH research;

4)   CIH Researcher Training –   access to existing RAND research training as well as the potential for the Center to provide a research training home for those with training grants; and

5)   CIH RAND Partnership for Research –   a mentorship program to support successful CIH research.

By necessity the first step in the Center’s creation would be a meeting between the heads of interested CIH institutions to work out the details and to obtain buy-in.

The future success of CIH-directed research on CIH will require a pooling of talent and resources across institutions; something that the American chiropractic institutions have not yet been able to achieve. This article discusses one possible solution.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Chiropractic Research Section

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A Narrative Review of Lumbar Fusion Surgery With Relevance to Chiropractic Practice

By |June 6, 2019|Categories: Guidelines, Low Back Pain|

A Narrative Review of Lumbar Fusion Surgery With Relevance to Chiropractic Practice

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Chiropractic Medicine 2016 (Dec);   15 (4):   259–271

Clinton J. Daniels, DC, MS,
Pamela J. Wakefield, DC,
Glenn A. Bub, DC,
James D. Toombs, MD

Veteran Affairs Saint Louis Health Care System,
St. Louis, MO.


OBJECTIVE:   The purpose of this narrative review was to describe the most common spinal fusion surgical procedures, address the clinical indications for lumbar fusion in degeneration cases, identify potential complications, and discuss their relevance to chiropractic management of patients after surgical fusion.

METHODS:   The PubMed database was searched from the beginning of the record through March 31, 2015, for English language articles related to lumbar fusion or arthrodesis or both and their incidence, procedures, complications, and postoperative chiropractic cases. Articles were retrieved and evaluated for relevance. The bibliographies of selected articles were also reviewed.

RESULTS:   The most typical lumbar fusion procedures are posterior lumbar interbody fusion, anterior lumbar interbody fusion, transforaminal interbody fusion, and lateral lumbar interbody fusion. Fair level evidence supports lumbar fusion procedures for degenerative spondylolisthesis with instability and for intractable low back pain that has failed conservative care. Complications and development of chronic pain after surgery is common, and these patients frequently present to chiropractic physicians. Several reports describe the potential benefit of chiropractic management with spinal manipulation, flexion-distraction manipulation, and manipulation under anesthesia for postfusion low back pain. There are no published experimental studies related specifically to chiropractic care of postfusion low back pain.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Low Back Pain Guidelines Page and the:

Low Back Pain and Chiropractic Page

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