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Outcome Measures for Assessing the Effectiveness of Non-pharmacological Interventions in Frequent Episodic or Chronic Migraine

By |February 17, 2020|Categories: Migraine|

Outcome Measures for Assessing the Effectiveness of Non-pharmacological Interventions in Frequent Episodic or Chronic Migraine: A Delphi Study

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SOURCE:   BMJ Open. 2020 (Feb 12); 10 (2): e029855

Kerstin Luedtke, Annika Basener, Stephanie Bedei, Rene Castien, Aleksander Chaibi, et al

Pain and Exercise Research,
Universitat zu Lubeck Sektion Medizin,
Lubeck, Germany
kerstin.luedtke@uni-luebeck.de


OBJECTIVES:   The aim of this Delphi survey was to establish an international consensus on the most useful outcome measures for research on the effectiveness of non-pharmacological interventions for migraine. This is important, since guidelines for pharmacological trials recommend measuring the frequency of headaches with 50% reduction considered a clinically meaningful effect. It is unclear whether the same recommendations apply to complementary (or adjunct) non-pharmacological approaches, whether the same cut-off levels need to be considered for effectiveness when used as an adjunct or stand-alone intervention, and what is meaningful to patients.

SETTING:   University-initiated international survey.

PARTICIPANTS:   The expert panel was chosen based on publications on non-pharmacological interventions in migraine populations and from personal contacts. 35 eligible researchers were contacted, 12 agreed to participate and 10 completed all 3 rounds of the survey. To further explore how migraine patients viewed potential outcome measures, four migraine patients were interviewed and presented with the same measurement tools as the researchers.

PROCEDURES:   The initial Delphi round was based on a systematic search of the literature for outcome measures used in non-pharmacological interventions for headache.

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Does Manual Therapy Affect Functional and Biomechanical Outcomes of a Sit-To-Stand Task in a Population with Low Back Pain?

By |February 11, 2020|Categories: Low Back Pain|

Does Manual Therapy Affect Functional and Biomechanical Outcomes of a Sit-To-Stand Task in a Population with Low Back Pain? A Preliminary Analysis

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SOURCE:   Chiropractic & Manual Therapies 2020 (Jan 24)

Giancarlo Carpino, Steven Tran, Stuart Currie, Brian Enebo, Bradley S. Davidson, and Samuel J. Howarth

Division of Research and Innovation,
Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College,
Toronto, ON M2H 3 J1 Canada


INTRODUCTION:   Manual therapy (MT) hypothetically affects discrepant neuromuscular control and movement observed in populations with low back pain (LBP). Previous studies have demonstrated the limited influence of MT on movement, predominately during range of motion (ROM) testing. It remains unclear if MT affects neuromuscular control in mobility-based activities of daily living (ADLs). The sit-to-stand (STS) task represents a commonly-performed ADL that is used in a variety of clinical settings to assess functional and biomechanical performance.

OBJECTIVE:   To determine whether MT affects functional performance and biomechanical performance during a STS task in a population with LBP.

METHODS:   Kinematic data were recorded from the pelvis and thorax of participants with LBP, using an optoelectronic motion capture system as they performed a STS task before and after MT from November 2011 to August 2014. MT for each participant consisted of two high-velocity low-amplitude spinal manipulations, as well as two grade IV mobilizations of the lumbar spine and pelvis targeted toward the third lumbar vertebra and sacroiliac joint in a side-lying position; the order of these treatments was randomized. Pelvis and thorax kinematic data were used to derive the time-varying lumbar angle in the sagittal plane for each STS trial.

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LOW BACK PAIN Page

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Chiropractic Treatment of Older Adults with Neck Pain with or without Headache or Dizziness

By |January 31, 2020|Categories: Headache, Neck Pain, Vertigo|

Chiropractic Treatment of Older Adults with Neck Pain with or without Headache or Dizziness: Analysis of 288 Australian Chiropractors’ Self-reported Views

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Chiropractic & Manual Therapies 2019 (Dec 18); 27: 65

Dein Vindigni, Laura Zark, Tobias Sundberg, Matthew Leach, Jon Adams, and Michael F. Azari

Chiropractic Discipline,
School of Health and Biomedical Sciences,
RMIT University,
Melbourne, Australia.


BACKGROUND:   Neck pain is a leading cause of individual and societal burden worldwide, affecting an estimated 1 in 5 people aged 70 years and older. The nature and outcomes of chiropractic care for older adults with neck pain, particularly those with co-morbid headaches, remains poorly understood. Therefore, we sought to ascertain: What proportion of Australian chiropractors’ caseload comprises older adults with neck pain (with or without headache); How are these conditions treated; What are the reported outcomes?

METHODS:   An online survey examining practitioner and practice characteristics, clinical patient presentations, chiropractic treatment methods and outcomes, and other health service use, was distributed to a random nationally representative sample of 800 Australian chiropractors. Quantitative methods were used to analyze the data.

RESULTS:   Two hundred eighty-eight chiropractors (response rate = 36%) completed the survey between August and November 2017. Approximately one-third (M 28.5%, SD 14.2) of the chiropractors’ patients were older adults (i.e. aged ≥65 years), of which 45.5% (SD 20.6) presented with neck pain and 31.3% (SD 20.3) had co-morbid headache. Chiropractors reported to combine a range of physical and manual therapy treatments, exercises and self-management practices in their care of these patients particularly:

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HEADACHE Page and our

MEDICARE Information Page and our

VERTIGO and/or BALANCE Page

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Inappropriate Use of Skeletal Muscle Relaxants in Geriatric Patients

By |January 20, 2020|Categories: Low Back Pain, Muscle Relaxants|

Inappropriate Use of Skeletal Muscle Relaxants in Geriatric Patients

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SOURCE:   U. S. Pharmacist 2020 (Jan 21); 45 (1): 25–29

Caressa Trueman, PharmD, RPh, Shana Castillo, PharmD, RPh
Karen K. O’Brien, BS Pharm, PharmD, RPh, Eric Hoie, PharmD, RPh

Creighton University School of Pharmacy and Health Professions
Omaha, Nebraska


Falls in geriatric patients cost the United States billions of dollars each year and contribute to morbidity and mortality in this population. Polypharmacy can significantly contribute to the fall risk, especially those medications that are on the Beers Criteria list. Skeletal muscle relaxants are on this list, and an increased risk of falls is associated with their use. These medications are inappropriately used as an alternative to conventional pain medications and can be as harmful as opioids in the geriatric population. Education of patients and prescribers is necessary in order to prevent inappropriate muscle-relaxant use and to lessen the risk of falls.

In the United States, an estimated 29 million falls occurred in 46 million people older than age 65 years in 2014, and 7 million of those falls resulted in injuries. [1] In 2015, estimated medical costs related to fatal and nonfatal falls totaled more than $49 billion. [2]

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LOW BACK PAIN Page and the:

IATROGENIC INJURY Page

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Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis with Marine and Botanical Oils

By |January 8, 2020|Categories: Omega-3 Fatty Acids|

Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis with Marine and Botanical Oils: An 18-month, Randomized, and Double-blind Trial

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2014 (Mar 19)

George W. Reed, Katherine Leung, Ronald G. Rossetti, Susan VanBuskirk, John T. Sharp, and Robert B. Zurier

University of Massachusetts Medical School,
Department of Medicine,
Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine,
55 Lake Avenue North, Shaw Building,
Worcester, MA 01655, USA.


OBJECTIVE:   To determine whether a combination of borage seed oil rich in gamma linolenic acid (GLA) and fish oil rich in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is superior to either oil alone for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

METHODS:   Patients were randomized into a double-blind, 18–month trial. Mixed effects models compared trends over time in disease activity measures.

RESULTS:   No significant differences were observed in changes in disease activity among the three randomized groups. Each group exhibited significant reductions in disease activity (DAS28) at 9 months (fish: –1.56[–2.16, –0.96], borage: –1.33[–1.83, –0.84], combined: –1.18[–1.83, –0.54]) and in CDAI (fish: –16.95[–19.91, –13.98], borage: –11.20[–14.21, –8.19], and combined: –10.31[–13.61, –7.01]). There were no significant differences in change of RA medications among the three groups. Reduced disease activity in study patients was similar to matched patients from an RA registry, and reduction in disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) use was greater (P < 0.03) in study patients.

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OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS Page and the:

GAMMA-LINOLENIC ACID (GLA) Page

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Cost-Efficiency and Effectiveness of Including Doctors of Chiropractic to Offer Treatment Under Medicaid

By |January 7, 2020|Categories: Cost-Effectiveness|

Cost-Efficiency and Effectiveness of Including Doctors of Chiropractic to Offer Treatment Under Medicaid:
A Critical Appraisal of Missouri Inclusion of Chiropractic Under Missouri Medicaid

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Journal of Chiropractic Humanities 2019 (Dec 10)

John R. McGowan, PhD, Leonard Suiter, DC, FICC

Department of Accounting,
Richard A. Chaifetz School of Business,
Saint Louis University,
St. Louis, Missouri


OBJECTIVES:   The objectives of this study were to critically evaluate the methodology and conclusions of the fiscal notes prepared by the state of Missouri for including doctors of chiropractic (DCs) under Missouri Medicaid and to develop a dynamic scoring model that calculates the savings if DCs were allowed to offer treatment under Missouri Medicaid.

METHODS:   We used a secondary analysis to determine the cost-saving assumptions to be incorporated into a dynamic model. We reviewed the literature on efficiency and effectiveness of DC–delivered care regarding the most reliable assumptions concerning cost savings and utilization. The assumptions for percentage savings from DC–provided care and the avoidance of spinal surgeries were then combined in the dynamic scoring model to determine projected cost savings from adding DCs as covered providers under Missouri Medicaid. The actual cost of opioid abuse in Missouri was then determined as a basis to measure cost savings from adding DC care as an alternative therapy for the management of neck and low back pain.

DISCUSSION:   The Missouri Health Division initially used the static scoring approach to evaluate proposals to cover DC care under Missouri Medicaid. This approach only considers added costs from a legislative change.

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Cost-Effectiveness Page and the:

Medicare Information Page

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