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Maternal Report of Outcomes of Chiropractic Care for Infants

By |July 2, 2019|Patient Satisfaction, Pediatrics|

Maternal Report of Outcomes of Chiropractic Care for Infants

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SOURCE:   J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2019 (Mar; 42 (3): 167–176

Joyce E. Miller, DC, PhD, Heather A. Hanson, DC, MSc, Mandy Hiew, BA, Derek S. Lo Tiap Kwong, BA, Zicheng Mok, BA, Yun-Han Tee, BA

Outpatient Teaching Clinic,
AECC University College,
Bournemouth, Dorset, UK.


OBJECTIVE:   The purpose of this study was to investigate the report by mothers of their infants’ condition before and after a trial of care provided by registered chiropractic clinicians in addition to ratings of satisfaction, cost of care, and reports of any adverse events or side effects. A second purpose was to report the demographic profile of infants who presented for care to 16 chiropractic clinics in the United Kingdom.

METHODS:   This observational study prospectively collected reports by mothers of their infants’ demographic profiles and outcomes across several domains of infant behavior and their own mental state using the United Kingdom Infant Questionnaire. Participating registered chiropractors were recruited through the Royal College of Chiropractors annual meeting in January 2016, and 15 clinics and the Anglo-European College of Chiropractic University College teaching clinic volunteered to participate.

RESULTS:   In all, 2001 mothers completed intake questionnaires and 1092 completed follow-up forms. Statistically significant (P < .05) improvements were reported across all aspects of infant behavior studied, including feeding problems, sleep issues, excessive crying, problems with supine sleep position, infant pain, restricted cervical range of motion, and time performing prone positioning. Maternal ratings of depression, anxiety, and satisfaction with motherhood also demonstrated statistically significant improvement (P < .05). In total, 82% (n = 797) reported definite improvement of their infants on a global impression of change scale. As well, 95% (n = 475) reported feeling that the care was cost-effective, and 90.9% (n = 712) rated their satisfaction 8 or higher on an 11–point scale. Minor self-limiting side effects were reported (5.8%, n = 42/727) but no adverse events.

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Change in Young People’s Spine Pain Following Chiropractic Care at a Publicly Funded Healthcare Facility in Canada

By |May 7, 2019|Pediatrics, Spinal Pain|

Change in Young People’s Spine Pain Following Chiropractic Care at a Publicly Funded Healthcare Facility in Canada

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SOURCE:   Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2019 (May); 35: 301–307

Christian Manansala, DC, MSc(c), Steven Passmore, DC, PhD, Katie Pohlman, DC, PhD(c), Audrey Toth, DC, Gerald Olin, BSc, DC, CDir

Faculty of Kinesiology and Recreation Management,
University of Manitoba, Canada.



BACKGROUND:   The presence of spinal pain in young people has been established as a risk factor for spinal pain later in life. Recent clinical practice guidelines recommend spinal manipulation (SM), soft tissue therapy, acupuncture, and other modalities that are common treatments provided by chiropractors, as interventions for spine pain. Less is known specifically on the response to chiropractic management in young people with spinal pain. The purpose of this manuscript was to describe the impact, through pain measures, of a pragmatic course of chiropractic management in young people’s spinal pain at a publicly funded healthcare facility for a low-income population.

METHODS:   The study utilized a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected quality assurance data attained from the Mount Carmel Clinic (MCC) chiropractic program database. Formal permission to conduct the analysis of the database was acquired from the officer of records at the MCC. The University of Manitoba’s Health Research Ethics Board approved all procedures.

RESULTS:   Young people (defined as 10-24 years of age) demonstrated statistically and clinically significant improvement on the numeric rating scale (NRS) in all four spinal regions following chiropractic management.

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Diagnosis and Chiropractic Treatment of Infant Headache Based on Behavioral Presentation and Physical Findings

By |March 23, 2019|Headache, Pediatrics|

Diagnosis and Chiropractic Treatment of Infant Headache Based on Behavioral Presentation and Physical Findings: A Retrospective Series of 13 Cases

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SOURCE:   J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2009 (Oct); 32 (8): 682–686

Aurélie M. Marchand, MChiro, DC, Joyce E. Miller, BS, DC, Candice Mitchell, MChiro

Private Practice,
Brussels, Belgium



OBJECTIVE:   This case series presents information on diagnosis and treatment of 13 cases of benign infant headache presenting to a chiropractic teaching clinic.

CLINICAL FEATURES:   A retrospective search was performed for files of infants presenting with probable headache revealing 13 cases of headache from 350 files.

INTERVENTION AND OUTCOMES:   Thirteen cases (6 females, 7 males) from 2 days old to 8.5 months old were identified by behavioral presentation, parental, or medical diagnosis. In the cohort, historical findings included: birth trauma, assisted birth, familial headache history and feeding difficulty. Examination and behavioral findings were grabbing or holding of the face, ineffective latching, grimacing and positional discomfort, rapping head against the floor, photophobia and anorexia. Posterior joint restrictions of the cervical spine were found in these cases. No cases of malignant headache were found. All infants received a trial of chiropractic care including manual therapy.

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Manual Therapy for the Pediatric Population

By |March 21, 2019|Pediatrics|

Manual Therapy for the Pediatric Population: A Systematic Review

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SOURCE:   BMC Complement Altern Med. 2019 (Mar 13); 19 (1): 60

Carol Parnell Prevost, Brian Gleberzon, Beth Carleo, Kristian Anderson, Morgan Cark and Katherine A. Pohlman

Palmer College of Chiropractic,
4777 City Center Parkway,
Port Orange, FL, 32129, USA.



BACKGROUND:   This systematic review evaluates the use of manual therapy for clinical conditions in the pediatric population, assesses the methodological quality of the studies found, and synthesizes findings based on health condition. We also assessed the reporting of adverse events within the included studies and compared our conclusions to those of the UK Update report.

METHODS:   Six databases were searched using the following inclusion criteria: children under the age of 18 years old; treatment using manual therapy; any type of healthcare profession; published between 2001 and March 31, 2018; and English. Case reports were excluded from our study. Reference tracking was performed on six published relevant systematic reviews to find any missed article. Each study that met the inclusion criteria was screened by two authors to:

(i)   determine its suitability for inclusion,

(ii)   extract data, and

(iii)   assess quality of study.

RESULTS:   Of the 3,563 articles identified, 165 full articles were screened, and 50 studies met the inclusion criteria. Twenty-six articles were included in prior reviews with 24 new studies identified. Eighteen studies were judged to be of high quality. Conditions evaluated were: attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism, asthma, cerebral palsy, clubfoot, constipation, cranial asymmetry, cuboid syndrome, headache, infantile colic, low back pain, obstructive apnea, otitis media, pediatric dysfunctional voiding, pediatric nocturnal enuresis, postural asymmetry, preterm infants, pulled elbow, suboptimal infant breastfeeding, scoliosis, suboptimal infant breastfeeding, temporomandibular dysfunction, torticollis, and upper cervical dysfunction. Musculoskeletal conditions, including low back pain and headache, were evaluated in seven studies. Twenty studies reported adverse events, which were transient and mild to moderate in severity.

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Instrument-assisted Delivery and the Prevalence of Reduced Cervical Spine Range of Motion in Infants

By |February 11, 2019|Pediatrics|

Instrument-assisted Delivery and the Prevalence of Reduced Cervical Spine Range of Motion in Infants

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SOURCE:   Chiropractic J Australia 2018 (Jun); 46 (2): 162–171

Christian Fludder, B.Chiro.Sc, M.Chiro, DACCP,
Braden G. Keil, B.App.Sc. (Chiropractic), M.C.Sc. (Paediatrics), FICC, FACCP

Chiropractic Children’s Healthcare,
9 Lower Plenty Road,
Rosanna, VIC, 3084



Introduction:   Instrument-assisted delivery occurs regularly in Australia. This study aims to determine if there is a higher prevalence of restricted cervical spine range of motion (ROM) in infants born via instrumental delivery or Caesarean section compared to vaginal delivery without instrument assistance.

Methods:   Data was collated from all 176 infants under 112 days of age in a paediatric chiropractic clinic. Details regarding method of delivery and instrumental assistance were obtained. Passive ROM assessment was recorded as either “Full” or “Reduced”.

Results:   Reduced cervical spine ROM was apparent in 76.1% of infants born vaginally without intervention (n=88), 75.0% with forceps assistance (n=16), 88.9% with vacuum-assistance (n = 18), 100% born with vacuum and forceps (n=3), and 82.3% born via Caesarean section (n = 51).

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Spinal Pain and Co-occurrence with Stress and General Well-being Among Young Adolescents

By |December 26, 2018|Pediatrics|

Spinal Pain and Co-occurrence with Stress and General Well-being Among Young Adolescents: A Study Within the Danish National Birth Cohort

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SOURCE:   European Journal of Pediatrics 2017 (Jun); 176 (6): 807–814

Sandra Elkjær Stallknecht & Katrine Strandberg-Larsen & Lise Hestbæk & Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen

Department of Public Health, Section of Social Medicine,
University of Copenhagen,
Øster Farimagsgade 5, 1014, Copenhagen, Denmark.


This study aims to describe the patterns in low back, mid back, and neck pain complaints in young adolescents from the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC) and to investigate the co-occurrence of spinal pain and stress and general well-being, respectively. Cross-sectional data from the 11-year follow-up of DNBC were used. As part of a web-based survey, a total of 45,371 young adolescents between 10 and 14 years old completed the Young Spine Questionnaire, the Stress in Children Questionnaire, and a one-item question on general well-being. Associations between spinal pain and, respectively, stress and general well-being were estimated by means of multiple logistic regression models. Almost one fifth of boys and one quarter of girls reported spinal pain. Compared with adolescents who reported no stress, adolescents reporting medium and high values of stress had odds ratios (OR) of 2.19 (95% CI 2.08-2.30) and 4.73 (95% CI 4.28-5.23), respectively, of reporting spinal pain (adjusted for age, gender, and maternal education). Adolescents who reported poor general well-being had an OR of 2.50 (95% CI 2.31-2.72) for reporting spinal pain compared to adolescents with good general well-being.

CONCLUSION:   Spinal pain in childhood and adolescence is strongly associated with spinal pain and generalized pain in adulthood. [2, 7, 11]. Therefore, it is of great importance to seek to treat and prevent spinal pain in children both to prevent discomfort for the child but also to reduce the individual and social costs of spinal pain in adulthood. If spinal pain among children and adolescents involves psychosocial well-being, then treatment as well as preventive initiatives might include psychosocial approaches, e.g., psycho education and development of appropriate coping strategies.

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