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The Chiropractic Scope of Practice in the United States

By |November 14, 2016|Scope of Practice|

The Chiropractic Scope of Practice in the United States: A Cross-sectional Survey

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SOURCE:   J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2014 (Jul); 37 (6): 363–376

Mabel Chang, DC, MPH

National University of Health Sciences-Florida,
Pinellas Park, FL.


OBJECTIVE:   The purpose of this study was to assess the current status of chiropractic practice laws in the United States. This survey is an update and expansion of 3 original surveys conducted in 1987, 1992, and 1998.

METHODS:   A cross-sectional survey of licensure officials from the Federation of Chiropractic Licensing Boards e-mail list was conducted in 2011 requesting information about chiropractic practice laws and 97 diagnostic, evaluation, and management procedures. To evaluate content validity, the survey was distributed in draft form at the fall 2010 Federation of Chiropractic Licensing Boards regional meeting to regulatory board members and feedback was requested. Comments were reviewed and incorporated into the final survey. A duplicate question was imbedded in the survey to test reliability.

RESULTS:   Partial or complete responses were received from 96% (n = 51) of the jurisdictions in the United States. The states with the highest number of services that could be performed were Missouri (n = 92), New Mexico (n = 91), Kansas (n = 89), Utah (n = 89), Oklahoma (n = 88), Illinois (n = 87), and Alabama (n = 86). The states with the highest number of services that cannot be performed are New Hampshire (n = 49), Hawaii (n = 47), Michigan (n = 42), New Jersey (n = 39), Mississippi (n = 39), and Texas (n = 30).

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ACA Advocates for N.M. Chiropractic Physicians’ Right to Self-Determination

By |September 19, 2012|Scope of Practice|

Source The ACA

The American Chiropractic Association (ACA) today(September 13th, 2012)  filed an amicus curiae (friend of the court) brief in the New Mexico Court of Appeals, supporting the expertise of chiropractic physicians in that state and their right to self-determination.

ACA was compelled to file the brief after the International Chiropractors Association (ICA) joined forces with the New Mexico Board of Pharmacy and the New Mexico Medical Board in a December 2011 memorandum to the court, requesting a halt to efforts by the New Mexico Board of Chiropractic Examiners to create an advanced practice training and certification program for chiropractic physicians.

In making its argument in favor of allowing New Mexico chiropractic physicians to chart their own course in this matter, ACA’s brief informs the court about the extensive educational background and training that chiropractic physicians receive today from accredited U.S. chiropractic colleges.

The brief also points out that ACA is the nation’s largest and preeminent chiropractic professional association, and that its long-established policy has been to recognize that local doctors are best equipped to determine matters of scope.

“It is ACA’s opinion that the New Mexico Board of Chiropractic Examiners should be given the same respect as other state boards and allowed to determine what is best for chiropractic physicians and patients in that state. We object in particular to actions by the ICA, as well as the state’s pharmacy and medical boards, to interfere with the will of chiropractic physicians in New Mexico and the needs of their patients,” said ACA President Keith Overland, DC.

It is uncertain at this time when the court will make its final ruling on the issue.

Texas: Chiropractic board pulls proposed rule to create specialties in nutrition, neurology

By |August 21, 2012|Scope of Practice|

From an article in  Statesman.com August 19th, 2012

The Texas Board of Chiropractic Examiners has said it will re-examine proposals to allow chiropractors to call themselves specialists in nutrition and neurology after hearing complaints from dietitians and physicians.

At a meeting in Austin on Thursday, the board heard from registered dietitians urging it to withdraw a proposal to create a specialty in chiropractic nutrition. The board also received letters from the Texas Medical Association and physicians strongly objecting to a chiropractic neurology specialty.

The board did not meet beforehand with the affected groups, as it is required to do, representatives of those groups said. Further, they have complained that the specialist training would be too little or vague and would confuse and potentially endanger the public. (more…)