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Visceral Responses to Spinal Manipulation

By |September 10, 2016|Spinal Manipulation, Visceral Disease|

Visceral Responses to Spinal Manipulation

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SOURCE:   J Electromyogr Kinesiol. 2012 (Oct); 22 (5): 777–784

Philip Bolton, Brian Budgell

School of Biomedical Sciences & Pharmacy,
Faculty of Health,
University of Newcastle,
Callaghan NSW 2308, Australia.
Philip.Bolton@newcastle.edu.au


While spinal manipulation is widely seen as a reasonable treatment option for biomechanical disorders of the spine, such as neck pain and low back pain, the use of spinal manipulation to treat non-musculoskeletal complaints remains controversial. This controversy is due in part to the perception that there is no robust neurobiological rationale to justify using a biomechanical treatment of the spine to address a disorder of visceral function. This paper therefore looks at the physiological evidence that spinal manipulation can impact visceral function. A structured search was conducted, using PubMed and the Index to Chiropractic Literature, to construct of corpus of primary data studies in healthy human subjects of the effects of spinal manipulation on visceral function. The corpus of literature is not large, and the greatest number of papers concerns cardiovascular function. Authors often attribute visceral effects of spinal manipulation to somato-autonomic reflexes. While this is not unreasonable, little attention is paid to alternative mechanisms such as somato-humoural pathways. Thus, while the literature confirms that mechanical stimulation of the spine modulates some organ functions in some cohorts, a comprehensive neurobiological rationale for this general phenomenon has yet to appear.


From the FULL TEXT Article:

Introduction

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What Effect Does Chiropractic Treatment Have on Gastrointestinal (GI) Disorder

By |August 6, 2015|Chiropractic Care, Gastrointestinal Disorders, Visceral Disease|

What Effect Does Chiropractic Treatment Have on Gastrointestinal (GI) Disorders: A Narrative Review of the Literature

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SOURCE:   J Can Chiropr Assoc 2015 (Jun);   59 (2):   122–133 ~ FULL TEXT

Katherine Angus, BSc(Kin), DC, Sepideh Asgharifar, BSc(Hons), DC,
Brian Gleberzon, DC, MHSc

Chiropractic and Health Associates Clinic,
1 St. Clair Ave West, Suite 404,
Toronto, Ontario.


The purpose of this study was to provide a narrative review of the literature of studies describing the management of disorders of the gastro-intestinal (GI) tract using ‘chiropractic therapy’ broadly defined here as spinal manipulation therapy, mobilizations, soft tissue therapy, modalities and stretches. Search limiters include access to full text studies published between 1980 and November 2012 in peer-reviewed journals, English language only involving human subjects. Twenty-one articles were found that met our inclusion criteria. Retrievable articles varied from case reports to clinical trials to review articles of management options. The majority of articles chronicling patient experiences under chiropractic care reported they demonstrated mild to moderate improvements in presenting symptoms. No adverse side effects were reported. This suggests chiropractic care can be considered as an adjunctive therapy for patients with various GI conditions providing there are no co-morbidities.

KEYWORDS:  chiropractic; gastro-intestinal; manipulation; therapy


From the FULL TEXT Article

Introduction

The purpose of this paper was to conduct a narrative review of the literature that investigated the effectiveness of chiropractic treatment for gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. A previous review by Gleberzon et al [1] reviewed the literature from 2007 to 2011 that investigated the use of one type of chiropractic treatment (spinal manipulative therapy) for pediatric health conditions one of which was colic, often considered a type of GI condition effecting infants [Authors’ note: there is considerable debate whether or not ‘infantile colic’ is a GI condition, or simply ‘baby back pain’ and there is debate if the method used to monitor its existence (crying time) is a subjective or objective outcome measure. [1] That debate notwithstanding, for the purposes of this report, we have included colic as a GI condition].

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Medical Management of Pediatric and Non-Musculoskeletal Conditions by Spinal Manipulation

By |January 23, 2014|Chiropractic Care, Non-Musculoskeletal Conditions, Pediatrics, Visceral Disease|

Medical Management of Pediatric and Non-Musculoskeletal Conditions by Spinal Manipulation

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Chiropractic Journal of Australia 2013 (Dec);   43 (4):   131–136 ~ FULL TEXT

Peter L. Rome, D.C.

Melbourne, Australia


Thanks to Dr. Rolf Peters, editor of the Chiropractic Journal of Australia for permission to republish this Full Text article, exclusively at Chiro.Org!

Considering the unpleasant fallout from the Simon Singh Case, this article sheds a unique, new perspective on manipulative care for non-musculoskeletal conditions.


The Abstract:   There is a well established precedent by medical doctors, particularly in Europe, of managing infant, paediatric and other patients for so-called organic conditions by spinal manipulation.   There are also claims that chiropractic should not be involved with this form of management for so-called visceral disorders because it does not quite meet the current orthodox theories.   This seems contradictory if not hypocritical when there is noted evidence in the medical literature itself of not only the rationale supporting these concepts, but evidence of medical doctors carrying out the same procedures for the same purpose on the same conditions.

Index terms: (MeSH):   chiropractic; manipulation, chiropractic; manipulation, orthopedic; manipulation, musculoskeletal; manipulation, spinal; pediatrics; evidence based medicine. (other): medical manipulative therapy.


From the Full-Text Article:

Introduction

Some have questioned the hypotheses justifying chiropractic involvement in the management of paediatric patients, as well as those with so-called visceral conditions. [1-4]   This topic was raised recently in a television program by Demasi. [5]

It is acknowledged that chiropractic constructs have been outside the traditional or orthodox models of understanding. However, there is a major contradiction regarding manipulative management of visceral and paediatric care due to the adoption of those very concepts by other areas of medicine – namely manipulative medicine. [6-9]

In particular, European medical doctors have published refereed papers on these very topics involving spinal manipulation in medical journals and medical textbooks for some decades. [10] (see Table 1)   In an apparent contradictory development, it is primarily English language medical authors and other sources that seem to have attracted critics who direct their reservations at the principles espoused by chiropractors, but not to their European medical colleagues who are proponents of spinal manipulation. [11]   It is also curious that osteopathic manipulative therapy does not appear to attract the same degree of debate and reservations despite the similarities.

There are at least three medical textbooks which include the topics of paediatric manipulative care and the manipulative management of visceral disorders. [6-8]   One such medical text is totally devoted to paediatric manual therapy. [6]


INFANTS

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